Oklahoma Environmental Services announced Wednesday the testing of soil and groundwater at 55 petroleum storage tank sites across Oklahoma, including Enid and the surrounding area. 

The tank sites, registered as "temporarily out of use," will be tested for potential leakage. They currently don't meet Environmental Protection Agency's guidelines either because of not meeting upgrade requirements for continued use or they have not been permanently closed to EPA standards, according to OES. 

Recently, Oklahoma Corporation Commission solicited bids from environmental consultants to conduct the sampling effort to determine if any of the tanks have previously leaked. OES won the bid to perform testing, and will begin at each site by drilling either 5 feet or 20 feet below the surface to collect soil and groundwater samples. 

If contamination is found, pending eligibility, an available state fund is open to help with required follow-up actions, according to OES. 

In a similar situation in 2015, OES examined a site in Okmulgee formerly known as Catfish George's Place, where former convenience store owner George LeGrand had tanks on his property needing to be removed, but was worried about it being costly. OES approached LeGrand and helped to resolve the storage tank issue. 

“Our commitment is to work as aggressively as possible to resolve cases and secure the environmental safety of the communities we serve,” said OES President Deanna Atkinson. “And getting to represent the best interest of clients like Mr. LeGrand is just icing on the cake.”

OES has offices in Oklahoma City, Tulsa and Enid, and completes field work and remediation with in-house consultants and field technicians. 

All 55 site assessments are scheduled for completion by May 15. 

For information about the investigation, OES can be reached at (888) 584-3386 or by visiting http://www.oeservices.net/

Article by Ryan Miller of the Enid News & Eagle

OKLAHOMA CITY, Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Tobey Heater recently joined the Oklahoma Environmental Services (OES) team as a project manager, specializing in environmental remediation. Heater, a licensed consultant, works on behalf of petroleum storage tank owners, the oil and gas industry and other businesses to coordinate with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to meet state requirements for site clean-ups.

"We work with clients in all phases of the compliance process, from the investigation to clean-up and closure," said Heater.

He contributes diverse experience to OES specifically in the areas of property development and redevelopment of properties that have a historic impact.

OES is a full-service environmental consulting firm celebrating its 15th anniversary in the environmental compliance and remediation industry. The firm has four Oklahoma locations: Enid, Moore, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. For more information on site clean-up or environmental regulations, contact Heater at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 888-584-3386.

Dona.Crouch resized

OKLAHOMA CITY - Dona Crouch recently joined the Oklahoma Environmental Services (OES) team as a project manager, with seventeen years of experience in oil and gas exploration and over twenty years of experience in the environmental consulting field.  Working with a broad diversity of oil and gas, industrial, and commercial clients, she has extensive field and management experience in site assessments for property transactions and in investigations relating to contaminant source identification and delineation, comprehensive through the design and implementation of remedial activities. Ms. Crouch specializes in meeting the environmental and regulatory service needs of the oil and gas industry and petroleum storage tank owners.  

In addition to being a licensed consultant with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission Petroleum Storage Division, she has extensive experience in dealing with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality and with the state regulatory agencies in Texas, New Mexico, and Kansas.

OES is a full-service environmental consulting firm celebrating its 15th anniversary in the environmental compliance and remediation industry. The firm has four Oklahoma locations: Enid, Moore, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. For more information on site clean-up or environmental regulations, contact Dona at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 888-584-3386.

The Journal Record

Deanna Atkinson’s employees are drilling holes and looking for petroleum, but she doesn’t want to sell oil. The president of Oklahoma Environmental Services and her staff are looking for leaking gasoline tanks. She is one of two contractors tasked with determining if closed fueling stations are seeping petroleum products into the ground.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission received $150,000 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess hundreds of shuttered gasoline stations across the state.

If contractors find pollution, however, it will take more money, time and work to remediate the contamination.

In the 1980s, the EPA strengthened regulations on petroleum storage tanks, requiring leak detection and prevention equipment. Many small business owners didn’t have the money to make the changes, and subsequently closed their businesses. Yet the rules didn’t require them to remove the noncompliant tanks.

The federal program is designed to help identify sites where gasoline or diesel flowed into soil or groundwater. The OCC determined that 1,745 tanks in the Sooner State needed upgrades, but only 1,319 made leak detection and prevention changes. Those out-of-service tanks can stay in the ground as long as monitoring equipment is maintained, said Robyn Strickland, agency Petroleum Storage Tank Division director.

However, 426 tanks were never upgraded or removed, she said. Letters to their operators went unanswered or were returned, so she prioritized sites that didn’t have a responsible party.

“We’re here to protect the environment,” Strickland said. “If we can’t contact the owners, at least we can identify those (sites) with contamination.”

The most recent round of funding covered the cost to assess 37 orphaned sites. A typical site has an average of three tanks, but Strickland didn’t have figures on how many tanks will be addressed with the $150,000 grant. The analysis and assessments must be completed by Sept. 30.

Atkinson won a contract to address 23 sites across the state. Her employees typically drill three 20-foot holes, taking soil and water samples. A laboratory will analyze the results to determine if gasoline or diesel leaked. One soil core appeared to have petroleum, but she hasn’t yet received confirmation.

“In an ideal world, you remove a tank when you quit using it,” Atkinson said. “That is when you do the site assessment to determine if there was a release of the product.”

Removing the pollution is another challenge. If tanks have been leaking for decades, there could be a growing plume of gasoline or diesel underground. The longer the sites are neglected, the harder and more expensive it is to get rid of the contamination, Atkinson said.

Contaminated orphan sites are eligible for federal money from the Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund. Strickland said she couldn’t estimate how long it would take to remove all the old tanks because remediation efforts depend on federal money.

“It is all contingent on funding and being able to locate someone who is responsible,” Strickland said. “That is the hardest part, is to find someone.”

Also check out the articale about us in the Enid News!